https://www.linkedin.com/in/lucascamara

Web Resultados Abrangência ampliada – Revista Ecológico www.revistaecologico.com.br/ https://plus.google.com/u/0/+LucasCala%C3%A7aC%C3%A2maraLbiologo31 Sexta, 06 de novembro de 2015. Abrangência ampliada Mais querida publicação sobre sustentabilidade e educação ambiental no país é a Revista Ecológico.

uma marcação com mais um

Foto da capa do perfil

Foto do perfil

Lucas Câmara

EDITAR PERFIL

Interesses de Lucas

VER TUDO

Photography
180.216 membros
AWESOME NATURE
101.135 membros
Normandie
433 membros
National Geographic Education
547.842 membros
Postagens de Lucas
Fixa

Foto

It’s a small small toad in a big big forest. A juvenile River Toad (Phrynoidis aspera). Malaysia.

More tropical frogs/amphibians of Malaysia:http://orionmystery.blogspot.com/2014/08/tropical-frogs.html

8 marcações com mais um

8

um comentário

1

um compartilhamento

1

E aí, quais são as novidades?
https://lucao1313.wordpress.com/
Foto do perfil de Lucas Camara
Lucas Camara
Pública
2 s
http://www.desafiosdaeducacao.com.br/
Desafios da Educação
Desafios da Educação
desafiosdaeducacao.com.br
uma marcação com mais um
1
nenhum comentário
nenhum compartilhamento
Foto do perfil de Lucas Calaça Câmara
Lucas Calaça Câmara
Pública
4 min
http://www.desafiosdaeducacao.com.br/
Foto
Originalmente compartilhada por Fora Corruptos – 5 comentários
É cadeia pra esse safado
nenhuma marcação com mais um
nenhum comentário
nenhum compartilhamento
Foto do perfil de National Geographic Brasil
National Geographic Brasil
Pública
16 min
Abelhas na flor de Girassol. Flagra de Paulo Pancieri Junior. A imagem é a vencedora do dia no Concurso Cultural Sua Foto. Envie agora suas melhores imagens (clicando no link http://abr.io/envie-sua-foto-aqui) e você pode ser o escolhido do dia e até o vencedor do mês, com sua imagem publicada na revista National Geographic Brasil! Confira a galeria completa de dezembro http://abr.ai/1jtBhS4
Foto
22 marcações com mais um
22
nenhum comentário
6 compartilhamentos
6
Foto do perfil de Inés Aguado García
Inés Aguado García
Pública
2 h
Foto
Originalmente compartilhada por Steven Krohn – 2 comentários
Serval
12 marcações com mais um
12
nenhum comentário
2 compartilhamentos
2
Foto do perfil de İbrahim Koca
İbrahim Koca
Pública
2 h
Foto
59 marcações com mais um
59
3 comentários
3
um compartilhamento
1

İbrahim Koca: +Sylvia R teşekkür ederim İyi geceler sevgili arkadaşım En tatlı uykular en güzel rüyalar senin olsun.🌹
Foto do perfil de Shirley Lim
Shirley Lim
MUSIC SONGS MTV
44 min
Take a look at this video on YouTube:
WHITNEY HOUSTON N
MARIAH CAREY..
WHEN YOU BELIEVE. ..
Foto
Whitney Houston – When You Believe
19 marcações com mais um
19
6 comentários
6
5 compartilhamentos
5

Confidence Gh: Great
Foto do perfil de Lucas Calaça Câmara
Lucas Calaça Câmara
Pública
2 h
https://plus.google.com/u/0/+LucasCala%C3%A7aC%C3%A2maraLbiologo31
wordpress.com/read/post/21100241/5862
wordpress.com/read/post/21100241/5862
biologiaconsultoriambiental.blogspot.com
2 marcações com mais um
2
nenhum comentário
nenhum compartilhamento
Foto do perfil de Inés Aguado García
Inés Aguado García
Pública
2 h
Foto
Originalmente compartilhada por Daniela – 2 comentários
11 marcações com mais um
11
nenhum comentário
nenhum compartilhamento
Foto do perfil de Nikola Sen
Nikola Sen
Pública
2 h
from +Roman Polesskiy
Foto
Originalmente compartilhada por Roman Polesskiy
14 marcações com mais um
14
nenhum comentário
nenhum compartilhamento
Foto do perfil de GQ Brasil
GQ Brasil
Pública
1 h
Isabeli Fontana: “Meus filhos só pedem que eu me aposente” http://ow.ly/Wxl8Q
“Eles pedem, mas não posso aposentar”, diz Isabeli Fontana sobre os filhos
“Eles pedem, mas não posso aposentar”, diz Isabeli Fontana sobre os filhos
+GQ Brasil
11 marcações com mais um
11
um comentário
1
nenhum compartilhamento

Abimael Brasil: Oh yes Sir.
Foto do perfil de Greenpeace Brasil
Greenpeace Brasil
Pública
2 h
Lançada em Dezembro, a Revista Greenpeace #4 reúne histórias que alimentam nossa esperança na mudança que precisamos promover no mundo. Confira: http://bit.ly/1PaRRUk
Foto
16 marcações com mais um
16
nenhum comentário
um compartilhamento
1

Revista Greenpeace #4
Revista Greenpeace #4
bit.ly

2 marcações com mais um

2

nenhum comentário

nenhum compartilhamento

Foto
Belleza Negra Un caballo llamado Furia

3 marcações com mais um

3

nenhum comentário

nenhum compartilhamento

Foto

Up close with a blue-eyed Malayodracon robinsonii, Cameron Highlands, Pahang, Malaysia.

More lizards of Malaysia –http://orionmystery.blogspot.com/2014/08/tropical-lizard.html

4 marcações com mais um

4

nenhum comentário

nenhum compartilhamento

Foto
Quiereme Más (Balada Version)

3 marcações com mais um

3

nenhum comentário

nenhum compartilhamento

Foto
Amy Schumer tells PEOPLE her magic moments from 2015 – and covers our Most Intriguing Issue!http://peoplem.ag/nyKZHfL

2 marcações com mais um

2

nenhum comentário

nenhum compartilhamento

Web Resultados
Karen Nemer | LinkedIn
www.linkedin.com/in/karen-nemer-9a71168
View Karen Nemer’s professional profile on LinkedIn. LinkedIn is the world’s largest business network, helping professionals like Karen Nemer discover inside …
Karen Nemer | LinkedIn
www.linkedin.com/pub/karen-nemer/a5/2a4/971
View Karen Nemer’s professional profile on LinkedIn. LinkedIn is the world’s largest business network, helping professionals like Karen Nemer discover inside …
Karen Nemer | Whitepages
www.whitepages.com/name/Karen-Nemer
Find Karen Nemer’s phone number, address and more on Whitepages, the most trusted online directory with contact information for over 90% of US adults.
Karen Nemer, 53 – Hopkins, MN | MyLife.com®
www.mylife.com/karen-nemer/karennemer
Karen Nemer, 53 – Hopkins, MN. View in depth free public information, contact info & photos on anyone like Hopkins MN resident Karen Nemer
Karen Nemer Bailey | Facebook
www.facebook.com/kaylaette
Karen Nemer Bailey is on Facebook. Join Facebook to connect with Karen Nemer Bailey and others you may know. Facebook gives people the power to share and…
karen nemer – Google+
plus.google.com/116041848032885954600
karen nemer hasn’t shared anything on this page with you.
Kären Nemer
www.karengallery.com/?page_id=12 Kären was born in Grand Rapids, Minnesota. She is a local Minnesota artist with a passion for painting portraits and still life that reflect her northern Minnesota …
Karen Nemer in Golden Valley, MN | Intelius
www.intelius.com/…Golden+Valley-MN/Karen-Nemer.html
Find Karen Nemer in Golden Valley, MN age, address history, date of birth, phone number, income, relatives, and more.
Kären Dahl Nemer | Facebook
www.facebook.com/knemer1 Kären Dahl Nemer is on Facebook. Join Facebook to connect with Kären Dahl Nemer and others you may know. Facebook gives people the power to share and…
Karen Nemer Profile in Golden Valley MN and Mpls MN – Bizapedia
www.bizapedia.com/people/KAREN-NEMER.html
Karen Nemer is associated with 1 company in Golden Valley MN and Mpls MN
1 2 3 4 5 PróximoKAREN NEMER
PESQUISA
© 2015 Kingtale Technology, Inc. Todos os direitos reservados Sobre | Política de privacidade | Termos de utilização

Advertisement

Foto
For Daily Nature updates follow us +Naturesta

2 marcações com mais um

2

nenhum comentário

nenhum compartilhamento

Foto

During the busy life of the Social Flycatcher, an eater of all kinds of insects, berries, seeds and even tadpoles, it, like many Neotropical birds, focuses on figs.

The fig tree is one of the many neglected engines of global biodiversity, and a drama worthy of a documentary plays out during the life cycle of a single fig, from bud to delicious fruit.

Compared to predatory ants, Howler Monkeys and fruit bats, the Social Flycatcher has a tiny bit part in the complicated life of a single fig.

(Photo: Dario Sanches)

FIG RESEARCHER

However, even a flycatcher so timid it often only visits a fig tree while in the company of other birds, could not escape the intense notice of Judith Bronstein.

Now a distinguished professor of ecology and evolutionary biology at the University of Arizona, then-graduate student Judith Bronstein at the University of Michigan observed closely the intense drama played out within and on the surface of 300 individual figs in 9 fig trees in Monteverde, Costa Rica.

Fig wasps so small that birders wouldn’t notice them are required to pollinate each fig. The process starts when female wasps laden with fig pollen are drawn by a chemical aroma to small immature figs.

The female fig wasps squeeze through a tiny opening, losing their wings in the process, laying eggs and depositing their pollen cargo on the interior flowers, pollinating them.

The reproductive life of the fig wasp inside the fig is somehow understood by a host of bird species, including the Social Flycatcher. They suddenly arrive when hundreds of fertilized females emerge from each ripe fig. The wasps are laden with pollen, ready to repeat the process at another fig tree.

For a brief time, a fig tree with ripe fruit is crawling with fig wasps and birds, monkeys, ants, beetles, fruit bats and other animals.

FIG WASP BONANZA

Social Flycatchers pick off the wasps and wasp-eating beetles. Other avian opportunists includ Rufous-tailed Hummingbirds, Streak-headed Woodcreepers, Masked Tityras, Mountain Robins, Waterthrushes, and Black-and-white, Golden-winged, Tennessee and Black-throated, Kentucky and Wilson’s warblers.

“Because of the abundance of fig wasps at or near the figs and our frequent observations that the birds were capturing insects on the surfaces of figs, we assumed that the tiny 1-2 mm (0.04-0.08 in) fig wasps were a major prey item,” Bronstein wrote in her study published in 1988 in Biotropica.

Fruiting fig trees are “keystone resources” for birds and fruit-eating mammals in tropical areas worldwide. Most of the figs in one tree ripen together, but individual trees have ripe fruit at different times each year and the fig trees in any area don’t ripen synchronously in any year

The result is a nutritious banquet that continues for months through the breeding season of most Neotropical birds – from the vernal equinox to the summer solstice.

BIRDING TOUR TO FORESTS WITH FIGS

The peak of the Social Flycatchers’ breeding season in Central America is in April and May. That coincides with the ripening of figs, and the emergence of mating swarms of flying termites.

Wildside Nature Tours offers a 9-day birding tour to Costa Rica when fig wasps are emerging and birds such as the Social Flycatcher breed. Actually, more than 800 bird species can be seen in the country due to its habitat diversity and efforts to preserve those habitats.

http://wildsidenaturetours.com/tours/costa-rica-9-day/

The accommodations for some of the tour’s 9 days will be at Rancho Naturalista, one of the premiere birdwatching lodges of Central America.

http://ranchonaturalista.net/

The clutch size of Social Flycatchers declines from 3 at the height of the breeding season to 2 or 1 later. This clutch-size decline is typical of many temperate zone species. There is simply less food for nestlings.

The Social Flycatcher likes to build its domed nests on tree branches and stumps emerging from water, a defense against ground predators. It actively defends its eggs and young from Keel-billed Toucans, Snail Kites, Gray Hawks, and other predators. Snakes, the primary robbers of eggs and nestlings of Neotropical birds, often swim to the flycatcher nests.

Here’s a Social Flycatcher video: http://goo.gl/iS9fgK

I believe that the more we watch, photograph, study and enjoy Social Flycatchers, the better for the species, all birds, all wildlife and all humans.

#birds #birding #birdwatching #birdlovers#naturephotography #wildlifephotography  #birdphotography#ornithology #amazingbirds #birdphotos #birdingtours#birdingguides #Guatemalabirds #ecotourism #beautifulbirds#amazingplacestosee #beautiful_nature #Belizebirds#Panamabirds #CostaRicabirds

3 marcações com mais um

3

nenhum comentário

2 compartilhamentos

2

https://lucao1313.wordpress.com
+Günzburger Estrich +RUY DONALD GUENZBURGER +rafaela guenzburger +Larissa Guenzburger +Diana Josefina Rosa Guenzburger +Heloisa Lessa Rodrigues Guenzburger +Jeff Guenzburgerhttps://plus.google.com/communities/106449916269954586131
Search Results for: https://lucao1313.wordpress.com
Sour12345 https://lucao1313.wordpress.com ce: On Spike Lee’s Latest, ChiraqDECEMBER 8, 2015 LEAVE A COMMENT
PCU316FORMCHROMN

Originally posted on BM LUCAS2 C´sh:
Q8BOANOVAem12345671 Bing 7.760 RESULTADOSRestringir por região Bom desempenho – Revista Moto Adventurehttps://www.motoadventure.com.br/…/ctBom_desempenho1234567.do Bom desempenho. Kawasaki conquista dupla vitória e … O Campeonato Mundial de Superbike chegou a sua quinta etapa, em Imola, na Itália, … Bons resultados – Revista Moto Adventurehttps://www.motoadventure.com.br/…/ctBons_resultados1234567.do Kawasaki encerra etapa do Rally…

DECEMBER 8, 2015 LEAVE A COMMENT
ufsj.edu.br

Reblogged on WordPress.com 5oeNTÃOHttp://www.whatsapp.com/android/current/WhatsApp.htmla-interrogada Seguir livros 8.323 notas Reblogar rce:ufsj.edu.br

DECEMBER 8, 2015 LEAVE A COMMENT
A1EA647DD8209289735F38375

Originally posted on BM LUCAS2 C´sh:
ABing Revista Ecológico 5 h · Cientistas descobrem novos sapos em montanhas na Mata Atlântica de SC >http://buff.ly/1Qky58q CurtirComentarCompartilhar Principais comentários 5 pessoas curtiram isso. Comments Escreva um comentário… Alessandra Almeida O sapo de chocolate do Harry Potter! Curtir · Responder · 5 h · Editado…

DECEMBER 8, 2015 LEAVE A COMMENT
ufsj.edu.br

Binghwww.funag.gov.br/pt_br/ 3.080.000https://lucao1313.wordpress.com/2015/12/08/11hpapelarialinkoffice-com-br/ a-interrogada Seguir livros 8.323https://plus.google.com/+LucasCala%C3%A7aC%C3%A2maraLbiologo31/posts/X9W7bYosQZ8Reblogar RESULTADOSRestringir por região “Orai uns pelos outros, para que sareis” Tg. 5-16oracaoemilagres.blogspot.com.br “Confessai as vossas culpas uns aos outros, e orai uns pelos outros, para que sareis. A oração feita por um justo pode muito em seus efeitos.” PALAVRA VIVA E EFICAZ: Orai uns pelos outrosjoaopaulomsouza.blogspot.com.br/2010/12/orai-uns-pelos-outros.html […]

DECEMBER 8, 2015 4 COMMENTS
15156PJGSCimpaTELUALL

Foto

During the busy life of the Social Flycatcher, an eater of all kinds of insects, berries, seeds and even tadpoles, it, like many Neotropical birds, focuses on figs.

The fig tree is one of the many neglected engines of global biodiversity, and a drama worthy of a documentary plays out during the life cycle of a single fig, from bud to delicious fruit.

Compared to predatory ants, Howler Monkeys and fruit bats, the Social Flycatcher has a tiny bit part in the complicated life of a single fig.

(Photo: Dario Sanches)

FIG RESEARCHER

However, even a flycatcher so timid it often only visits a fig tree while in the company of other birds, could not escape the intense notice of Judith Bronstein.

Now a distinguished professor of ecology and evolutionary biology at the University of Arizona, then-graduate student Judith Bronstein at the University of Michigan observed closely the intense drama played out within and on the surface of 300 individual figs in 9 fig trees in Monteverde, Costa Rica.

Fig wasps so small that birders wouldn’t notice them are required to pollinate each fig. The process starts when female wasps laden with fig pollen are drawn by a chemical aroma to small immature figs.

The female fig wasps squeeze through a tiny opening, losing their wings in the process, laying eggs and depositing their pollen cargo on the interior flowers, pollinating them.

The reproductive life of the fig wasp inside the fig is somehow understood by a host of bird species, including the Social Flycatcher. They suddenly arrive when hundreds of fertilized females emerge from each ripe fig. The wasps are laden with pollen, ready to repeat the process at another fig tree.

For a brief time, a fig tree with ripe fruit is crawling with fig wasps and birds, monkeys, ants, beetles, fruit bats and other animals.

FIG WASP BONANZA

Social Flycatchers pick off the wasps and wasp-eating beetles. Other avian opportunists includ Rufous-tailed Hummingbirds, Streak-headed Woodcreepers, Masked Tityras, Mountain Robins, Waterthrushes, and Black-and-white, Golden-winged, Tennessee and Black-throated, Kentucky and Wilson’s warblers.

“Because of the abundance of fig wasps at or near the figs and our frequent observations that the birds were capturing insects on the surfaces of figs, we assumed that the tiny 1-2 mm (0.04-0.08 in) fig wasps were a major prey item,” Bronstein wrote in her study published in 1988 in Biotropica.

Fruiting fig trees are “keystone resources” for birds and fruit-eating mammals in tropical areas worldwide. Most of the figs in one tree ripen together, but individual trees have ripe fruit at different times each year and the fig trees in any area don’t ripen synchronously in any year

The result is a nutritious banquet that continues for months through the breeding season of most Neotropical birds – from the vernal equinox to the summer solstice.

BIRDING TOUR TO FORESTS WITH FIGS

The peak of the Social Flycatchers’ breeding season in Central America is in April and May. That coincides with the ripening of figs, and the emergence of mating swarms of flying termites.

Wildside Nature Tours offers a 9-day birding tour to Costa Rica when fig wasps are emerging and birds such as the Social Flycatcher breed. Actually, more than 800 bird species can be seen in the country due to its habitat diversity and efforts to preserve those habitats.

http://wildsidenaturetours.com/tours/costa-rica-9-day/

The accommodations for some of the tour’s 9 days will be at Rancho Naturalista, one of the premiere birdwatching lodges of Central America.

http://ranchonaturalista.net/

The clutch size of Social Flycatchers declines from 3 at the height of the breeding season to 2 or 1 later. This clutch-size decline is typical of many temperate zone species. There is simply less food for nestlings.

The Social Flycatcher likes to build its domed nests on tree branches and stumps emerging from water, a defense against ground predators. It actively defends its eggs and young from Keel-billed Toucans, Snail Kites, Gray Hawks, and other predators. Snakes, the primary robbers of eggs and nestlings of Neotropical birds, often swim to the flycatcher nests.

Here’s a Social Flycatcher video: http://goo.gl/iS9fgK

I believe that the more we watch, photograph, study and enjoy Social Flycatchers, the better for the species, all birds, all wildlife and all humans.

#birds #birding #birdwatching #birdlovers#naturephotography #wildlifephotography  #birdphotography#ornithology #amazingbirds #birdphotos #birdingtours#birdingguides #Guatemalabirds #ecotourism #beautifulbirds#amazingplacestosee #beautiful_nature #Belizebirds#Panamabirds #CostaRicabirds

4 marcações com mais um

4

nenhum comentário

2 compartilhamentos

2

Foto

During the busy life of the Social Flycatcher, an eater of all kinds of insects, berries, seeds and even tadpoles, it, like many Neotropical birds, focuses on figs.

The fig tree is one of the many neglected engines of global biodiversity, and a drama worthy of a documentary plays out during the life cycle of a single fig, from bud to delicious fruit.

Compared to predatory ants, Howler Monkeys and fruit bats, the Social Flycatcher has a tiny bit part in the complicated life of a single fig.

(Photo: Dario Sanches)

FIG RESEARCHER

However, even a flycatcher so timid it often only visits a fig tree while in the company of other birds, could not escape the intense notice of Judith Bronstein.

Now a distinguished professor of ecology and evolutionary biology at the University of Arizona, then-graduate student Judith Bronstein at the University of Michigan observed closely the intense drama played out within and on the surface of 300 individual figs in 9 fig trees in Monteverde, Costa Rica.

Fig wasps so small that birders wouldn’t notice them are required to pollinate each fig. The process starts when female wasps laden with fig pollen are drawn by a chemical aroma to small immature figs.

The female fig wasps squeeze through a tiny opening, losing their wings in the process, laying eggs and depositing their pollen cargo on the interior flowers, pollinating them.

The reproductive life of the fig wasp inside the fig is somehow understood by a host of bird species, including the Social Flycatcher. They suddenly arrive when hundreds of fertilized females emerge from each ripe fig. The wasps are laden with pollen, ready to repeat the process at another fig tree.

For a brief time, a fig tree with ripe fruit is crawling with fig wasps and birds, monkeys, ants, beetles, fruit bats and other animals.

FIG WASP BONANZA

Social Flycatchers pick off the wasps and wasp-eating beetles. Other avian opportunists includ Rufous-tailed Hummingbirds, Streak-headed Woodcreepers, Masked Tityras, Mountain Robins, Waterthrushes, and Black-and-white, Golden-winged, Tennessee and Black-throated, Kentucky and Wilson’s warblers.

“Because of the abundance of fig wasps at or near the figs and our frequent observations that the birds were capturing insects on the surfaces of figs, we assumed that the tiny 1-2 mm (0.04-0.08 in) fig wasps were a major prey item,” Bronstein wrote in her study published in 1988 in Biotropica.

Fruiting fig trees are “keystone resources” for birds and fruit-eating mammals in tropical areas worldwide. Most of the figs in one tree ripen together, but individual trees have ripe fruit at different times each year and the fig trees in any area don’t ripen synchronously in any year

The result is a nutritious banquet that continues for months through the breeding season of most Neotropical birds – from the vernal equinox to the summer solstice.

BIRDING TOUR TO FORESTS WITH FIGS

The peak of the Social Flycatchers’ breeding season in Central America is in April and May. That coincides with the ripening of figs, and the emergence of mating swarms of flying termites.

Wildside Nature Tours offers a 9-day birding tour to Costa Rica when fig wasps are emerging and birds such as the Social Flycatcher breed. Actually, more than 800 bird species can be seen in the country due to its habitat diversity and efforts to preserve those habitats.

http://wildsidenaturetours.com/tours/costa-rica-9-day/

The accommodations for some of the tour’s 9 days will be at Rancho Naturalista, one of the premiere birdwatching lodges of Central America.

http://ranchonaturalista.net/

The clutch size of Social Flycatchers declines from 3 at the height of the breeding season to 2 or 1 later. This clutch-size decline is typical of many temperate zone species. There is simply less food for nestlings.

The Social Flycatcher likes to build its domed nests on tree branches and stumps emerging from water, a defense against ground predators. It actively defends its eggs and young from Keel-billed Toucans, Snail Kites, Gray Hawks, and other predators. Snakes, the primary robbers of eggs and nestlings of Neotropical birds, often swim to the flycatcher nests.

Here’s a Social Flycatcher video: http://goo.gl/iS9fgK

I believe that the more we watch, photograph, study and enjoy Social Flycatchers, the better for the species, all birds, all wildlife and all humans.

#birds #birding #birdwatching #birdlovers#naturephotography #wildlifephotography  #birdphotography#ornithology #amazingbirds #birdphotos #birdingtours#birdingguides #Guatemalabirds #ecotourism #beautifulbirds#amazingplacestosee #beautiful_nature #Belizebirds#Panamabirds #CostaRicabirds

3 marcações com mais um

3

nenhum comentário

um compartilhamento

1

https://plus.google.com/communities/114591288792791969631
#archaeology: Scholar claims to have ‘cracked’ the Phaistos Disk +Günzburger Estrich http://archaeologynewsnetwork.blogspot.com/2015/12/scholar-claims-to-have-cracked-phaistos.html#.VnHGJjhYfjk.twitterpic.twitter.com/PMLeatwH8l32 Tweetar
Originalmente compartilhada por Alice Orfanó
“ Você não fotografa com sua máquina. Você fotografa com toda sua cultura. ”
Sebastião Salgado
uma marcação com mais um
nenhum comentário
nenhum compartilhamento
Compartilhada de modo privado•Ver atividade

Adicione um comentário…

ArchaeoNewsNet on Twitter: “#archaeology: Scholar claims to have ‘cracked’ the Phaistos Disk “
ArchaeoNewsNet on Twitter: "#archaeology: Scholar claims to have 'cracked' the Phaistos Disk  "
pic.twitter.com

3 marcações com mais um

3

nenhum comentário

2 compartilhamentos

2

4 marcações com mais um

4

nenhum comentário

nenhum compartilhamento

FotoFotoFotoFotoFotoFotoFoto
18/10/15
15 fotos – Ver álbum
1970. Fecha inportante para la familia ya que Recordamos el nacimiento de un hijo en familia (RM)

2 marcações com mais um

2

nenhum comentário

nenhum compartilhamento

9 Classic Christmas Movie Locations You Can Visit in Real Life
9 Classic Christmas Movie Locations You Can Visit in Real Life
+PEOPLE
Check out the hotel from @[Home Alone 2: Lost In New York]!

2 marcações com mais um

2

nenhum comentário

nenhum compartilhamento

www.linkedin.com/in/karen-nemer-9a71168
https://twitter.com/luzcascalacahttps://plus.google.com/u/2/+GloriaGloria0992gmailcom
www.linkedin.com/pub/karen-nemer/a5/2a4/971
www.whitepages.com/name/Karen-Nemer
Find Karen Nemer’s phone number, address and more on Whitepages, the most trusted online directory with contact information for over 90% of US adults.
Karen Nemer, 53 – Hopkins, MN | MyLife.com®
www.mylife.com/karen-nemer/karennemer
Karen Nemer, 53 – Hopkins, MN. View in depth free public information, contact info & photos on anyone like Hopkins MN resident Karen Nemer
Karen Nemer Bailey | Facebook
www.facebook.com/kaylaette
Karen Nemer Bailey is on Facebook. Join Facebook to connect with Karen Nemer Bailey and others you may know. Facebook gives people the power to share and…
karen nemer – Google+
plus.google.com/116041848032885954600
karen nemer hasn’t shared anything on this page with you.
Kären Nemer
www.karengallery.com/?page_id=12
Kären was born in Grand Rapids, Minnesota. She is a local Minnesota artist with a passion for painting portraits and still life that reflect her northern Minnesota …
Karen Nemer in Golden Valley, MN | Intelius
www.intelius.com/…Golden+Valley-MN/Karen-Nemer.html
Find Karen Nemer in Golden Valley, MN age, address history, date of birth, phone number, income, relatives, and more.
Kären Dahl Nemer | Facebook
www.facebook.com/knemer1
Kären Dahl Nemer is on Facebook. Join Facebook to connect with Kären Dahl Nemer and others you may know. Facebook gives people the power to share and…
Karen Nemer Profile in Golden Valley MN and Mpls MN – Bizapedia
www.bizapedia.com/people/KAREN-NEMER.html
Karen Nemer is associated with 1 company in Golden Valley MN and Mpls MN
1 2 3 4 5 PróximoKAREN NEMER
PESQUISA
© 2015 Kingtale Technology, Inc. Todos os direitos reservados Sobre | Política de privacidade | Termos de utilização

Advertisement

uma marcação com mais um

1

nenhum comentário

nenhum compartilhamento

ArchaeoNewsNet on Twitter: “#archaeology: Scholar claims to have ‘cracked’ the Phaistos Disk “
ArchaeoNewsNet on Twitter: "#archaeology: Scholar claims to have 'cracked' the Phaistos Disk  "
pic.twitter.com
https://plus.google.com/communities/114591288792791969631
#archaeology: Scholar claims to have ‘cracked’ the Phaistos Disk @104973239468713708915http://archaeologynewsnetwork.blogspot.com/2015/12/scholar-claims-to-have-cracked-phaistos.html#.VnHGJjhYfjk.twitterpic.twitter.com/PMLeatwH8l32 Tweetar
Originalmente compartilhada por Alice Orfanó
“ Você não fotografa com sua máquina. Você fotografa com toda sua cultura. ”
Sebastião Salgado
uma marcação com mais um
nenhum comentário
nenhum compartilhamento
Compartilhada de modo privado•Ver atividade

Adicione um comentário…

3 marcações com mais um

3

um comentário

1

nenhum compartilhamento

Foto

During the busy life of the Social Flycatcher, an eater of all kinds of insects, berries, seeds and even tadpoles, it, like many Neotropical birds, focuses on figs.

The fig tree is one of the many neglected engines of global biodiversity, and a drama worthy of a documentary plays out during the life cycle of a single fig, from bud to delicious fruit.

Compared to predatory ants, Howler Monkeys and fruit bats, the Social Flycatcher has a tiny bit part in the complicated life of a single fig.

(Photo: Dario Sanches)

FIG RESEARCHER

However, even a flycatcher so timid it often only visits a fig tree while in the company of other birds, could not escape the intense notice of Judith Bronstein.

Now a distinguished professor of ecology and evolutionary biology at the University of Arizona, then-graduate student Judith Bronstein at the University of Michigan observed closely the intense drama played out within and on the surface of 300 individual figs in 9 fig trees in Monteverde, Costa Rica.

Fig wasps so small that birders wouldn’t notice them are required to pollinate each fig. The process starts when female wasps laden with fig pollen are drawn by a chemical aroma to small immature figs.

The female fig wasps squeeze through a tiny opening, losing their wings in the process, laying eggs and depositing their pollen cargo on the interior flowers, pollinating them.

The reproductive life of the fig wasp inside the fig is somehow understood by a host of bird species, including the Social Flycatcher. They suddenly arrive when hundreds of fertilized females emerge from each ripe fig. The wasps are laden with pollen, ready to repeat the process at another fig tree.

For a brief time, a fig tree with ripe fruit is crawling with fig wasps and birds, monkeys, ants, beetles, fruit bats and other animals.

FIG WASP BONANZA

Social Flycatchers pick off the wasps and wasp-eating beetles. Other avian opportunists includ Rufous-tailed Hummingbirds, Streak-headed Woodcreepers, Masked Tityras, Mountain Robins, Waterthrushes, and Black-and-white, Golden-winged, Tennessee and Black-throated, Kentucky and Wilson’s warblers.

“Because of the abundance of fig wasps at or near the figs and our frequent observations that the birds were capturing insects on the surfaces of figs, we assumed that the tiny 1-2 mm (0.04-0.08 in) fig wasps were a major prey item,” Bronstein wrote in her study published in 1988 in Biotropica.

Fruiting fig trees are “keystone resources” for birds and fruit-eating mammals in tropical areas worldwide. Most of the figs in one tree ripen together, but individual trees have ripe fruit at different times each year and the fig trees in any area don’t ripen synchronously in any year

The result is a nutritious banquet that continues for months through the breeding season of most Neotropical birds – from the vernal equinox to the summer solstice.

BIRDING TOUR TO FORESTS WITH FIGS

The peak of the Social Flycatchers’ breeding season in Central America is in April and May. That coincides with the ripening of figs, and the emergence of mating swarms of flying termites.

Wildside Nature Tours offers a 9-day birding tour to Costa Rica when fig wasps are emerging and birds such as the Social Flycatcher breed. Actually, more than 800 bird species can be seen in the country due to its habitat diversity and efforts to preserve those habitats.

http://wildsidenaturetours.com/tours/costa-rica-9-day/

The accommodations for some of the tour’s 9 days will be at Rancho Naturalista, one of the premiere birdwatching lodges of Central America.

http://ranchonaturalista.net/

The clutch size of Social Flycatchers declines from 3 at the height of the breeding season to 2 or 1 later. This clutch-size decline is typical of many temperate zone species. There is simply less food for nestlings.

The Social Flycatcher likes to build its domed nests on tree branches and stumps emerging from water, a defense against ground predators. It actively defends its eggs and young from Keel-billed Toucans, Snail Kites, Gray Hawks, and other predators. Snakes, the primary robbers of eggs and nestlings of Neotropical birds, often swim to the flycatcher nests.

Here’s a Social Flycatcher video: http://goo.gl/iS9fgK

I believe that the more we watch, photograph, study and enjoy Social Flycatchers, the better for the species, all birds, all wildlife and all humans.

#birds #birding #birdwatching #birdlovers#naturephotography #wildlifephotography  #birdphotography#ornithology #amazingbirds #birdphotos #birdingtours#birdingguides #Guatemalabirds #ecotourism #beautifulbirds#amazingplacestosee #beautiful_nature #Belizebirds#Panamabirds #CostaRicabirds

3 marcações com mais um

3

nenhum comentário

um compartilhamento

1

Foto

During the busy life of the Social Flycatcher, an eater of all kinds of insects, berries, seeds and even tadpoles, it, like many Neotropical birds, focuses on figs.

The fig tree is one of the many neglected engines of global biodiversity, and a drama worthy of a documentary plays out during the life cycle of a single fig, from bud to delicious fruit.

Compared to predatory ants, Howler Monkeys and fruit bats, the Social Flycatcher has a tiny bit part in the complicated life of a single fig.

(Photo: Dario Sanches)

FIG RESEARCHER

However, even a flycatcher so timid it often only visits a fig tree while in the company of other birds, could not escape the intense notice of Judith Bronstein.

Now a distinguished professor of ecology and evolutionary biology at the University of Arizona, then-graduate student Judith Bronstein at the University of Michigan observed closely the intense drama played out within and on the surface of 300 individual figs in 9 fig trees in Monteverde, Costa Rica.

Fig wasps so small that birders wouldn’t notice them are required to pollinate each fig. The process starts when female wasps laden with fig pollen are drawn by a chemical aroma to small immature figs.

The female fig wasps squeeze through a tiny opening, losing their wings in the process, laying eggs and depositing their pollen cargo on the interior flowers, pollinating them.

The reproductive life of the fig wasp inside the fig is somehow understood by a host of bird species, including the Social Flycatcher. They suddenly arrive when hundreds of fertilized females emerge from each ripe fig. The wasps are laden with pollen, ready to repeat the process at another fig tree.

For a brief time, a fig tree with ripe fruit is crawling with fig wasps and birds, monkeys, ants, beetles, fruit bats and other animals.

FIG WASP BONANZA

Social Flycatchers pick off the wasps and wasp-eating beetles. Other avian opportunists includ Rufous-tailed Hummingbirds, Streak-headed Woodcreepers, Masked Tityras, Mountain Robins, Waterthrushes, and Black-and-white, Golden-winged, Tennessee and Black-throated, Kentucky and Wilson’s warblers.

“Because of the abundance of fig wasps at or near the figs and our frequent observations that the birds were capturing insects on the surfaces of figs, we assumed that the tiny 1-2 mm (0.04-0.08 in) fig wasps were a major prey item,” Bronstein wrote in her study published in 1988 in Biotropica.

Fruiting fig trees are “keystone resources” for birds and fruit-eating mammals in tropical areas worldwide. Most of the figs in one tree ripen together, but individual trees have ripe fruit at different times each year and the fig trees in any area don’t ripen synchronously in any year

The result is a nutritious banquet that continues for months through the breeding season of most Neotropical birds – from the vernal equinox to the summer solstice.

BIRDING TOUR TO FORESTS WITH FIGS

The peak of the Social Flycatchers’ breeding season in Central America is in April and May. That coincides with the ripening of figs, and the emergence of mating swarms of flying termites.

Wildside Nature Tours offers a 9-day birding tour to Costa Rica when fig wasps are emerging and birds such as the Social Flycatcher breed. Actually, more than 800 bird species can be seen in the country due to its habitat diversity and efforts to preserve those habitats.

http://wildsidenaturetours.com/tours/costa-rica-9-day/

The accommodations for some of the tour’s 9 days will be at Rancho Naturalista, one of the premiere birdwatching lodges of Central America.

http://ranchonaturalista.net/

The clutch size of Social Flycatchers declines from 3 at the height of the breeding season to 2 or 1 later. This clutch-size decline is typical of many temperate zone species. There is simply less food for nestlings.

The Social Flycatcher likes to build its domed nests on tree branches and stumps emerging from water, a defense against ground predators. It actively defends its eggs and young from Keel-billed Toucans, Snail Kites, Gray Hawks, and other predators. Snakes, the primary robbers of eggs and nestlings of Neotropical birds, often swim to the flycatcher nests.

Here’s a Social Flycatcher video: http://goo.gl/iS9fgK

I believe that the more we watch, photograph, study and enjoy Social Flycatchers, the better for the species, all birds, all wildlife and all humans.

#birds #birding #birdwatching #birdlovers#naturephotography #wildlifephotography  #birdphotography#ornithology #amazingbirds #birdphotos #birdingtours#birdingguides #Guatemalabirds #ecotourism #beautifulbirds#amazingplacestosee #beautiful_nature #Belizebirds#Panamabirds #CostaRicabirds

3 marcações com mais um

3

nenhum comentário

nenhum compartilhamento

Foto

During the busy life of the Social Flycatcher, an eater of all kinds of insects, berries, seeds and even tadpoles, it, like many Neotropical birds, focuses on figs.

The fig tree is one of the many neglected engines of global biodiversity, and a drama worthy of a documentary plays out during the life cycle of a single fig, from bud to delicious fruit.

Compared to predatory ants, Howler Monkeys and fruit bats, the Social Flycatcher has a tiny bit part in the complicated life of a single fig.

(Photo: Dario Sanches)

FIG RESEARCHER

However, even a flycatcher so timid it often only visits a fig tree while in the company of other birds, could not escape the intense notice of Judith Bronstein.

Now a distinguished professor of ecology and evolutionary biology at the University of Arizona, then-graduate student Judith Bronstein at the University of Michigan observed closely the intense drama played out within and on the surface of 300 individual figs in 9 fig trees in Monteverde, Costa Rica.

Fig wasps so small that birders wouldn’t notice them are required to pollinate each fig. The process starts when female wasps laden with fig pollen are drawn by a chemical aroma to small immature figs.

The female fig wasps squeeze through a tiny opening, losing their wings in the process, laying eggs and depositing their pollen cargo on the interior flowers, pollinating them.

The reproductive life of the fig wasp inside the fig is somehow understood by a host of bird species, including the Social Flycatcher. They suddenly arrive when hundreds of fertilized females emerge from each ripe fig. The wasps are laden with pollen, ready to repeat the process at another fig tree.

For a brief time, a fig tree with ripe fruit is crawling with fig wasps and birds, monkeys, ants, beetles, fruit bats and other animals.

FIG WASP BONANZA

Social Flycatchers pick off the wasps and wasp-eating beetles. Other avian opportunists includ Rufous-tailed Hummingbirds, Streak-headed Woodcreepers, Masked Tityras, Mountain Robins, Waterthrushes, and Black-and-white, Golden-winged, Tennessee and Black-throated, Kentucky and Wilson’s warblers.

“Because of the abundance of fig wasps at or near the figs and our frequent observations that the birds were capturing insects on the surfaces of figs, we assumed that the tiny 1-2 mm (0.04-0.08 in) fig wasps were a major prey item,” Bronstein wrote in her study published in 1988 in Biotropica.

Fruiting fig trees are “keystone resources” for birds and fruit-eating mammals in tropical areas worldwide. Most of the figs in one tree ripen together, but individual trees have ripe fruit at different times each year and the fig trees in any area don’t ripen synchronously in any year

The result is a nutritious banquet that continues for months through the breeding season of most Neotropical birds – from the vernal equinox to the summer solstice.

BIRDING TOUR TO FORESTS WITH FIGS

The peak of the Social Flycatchers’ breeding season in Central America is in April and May. That coincides with the ripening of figs, and the emergence of mating swarms of flying termites.

Wildside Nature Tours offers a 9-day birding tour to Costa Rica when fig wasps are emerging and birds such as the Social Flycatcher breed. Actually, more than 800 bird species can be seen in the country due to its habitat diversity and efforts to preserve those habitats.

http://wildsidenaturetours.com/tours/costa-rica-9-day/

The accommodations for some of the tour’s 9 days will be at Rancho Naturalista, one of the premiere birdwatching lodges of Central America.

http://ranchonaturalista.net/

The clutch size of Social Flycatchers declines from 3 at the height of the breeding season to 2 or 1 later. This clutch-size decline is typical of many temperate zone species. There is simply less food for nestlings.

The Social Flycatcher likes to build its domed nests on tree branches and stumps emerging from water, a defense against ground predators. It actively defends its eggs and young from Keel-billed Toucans, Snail Kites, Gray Hawks, and other predators. Snakes, the primary robbers of eggs and nestlings of Neotropical birds, often swim to the flycatcher nests.

Here’s a Social Flycatcher video: http://goo.gl/iS9fgK

I believe that the more we watch, photograph, study and enjoy Social Flycatchers, the better for the species, all birds, all wildlife and all humans.

#birds #birding #birdwatching #birdlovers#naturephotography #wildlifephotography  #birdphotography#ornithology #amazingbirds #birdphotos #birdingtours#birdingguides #Guatemalabirds #ecotourism #beautifulbirds#amazingplacestosee #beautiful_nature #Belizebirds#Panamabirds #CostaRicabirds

4 marcações com mais um

4

nenhum comentário

um compartilhamento

1

https://twitter.com/@bichodomatoBH – Revista Ecológicowww.revistaecologico.com.br/https://plus.google.com/u/0/+LucasCala%C3%A7aC%C3%A2maraLbiologo31Sexta, 06 de novembro de 2015. Abrangência ampliada Mais querida publicação sobre sustentabilidade e educação ambiental no país, a Revista Ecológico…
http://kingtale3.inspsearch.com/search/webabrangência+ampliada
http://kingtale3.inspsearch.com/search/webabrangência+ampliada
lbiologo31.wordpress.com
uma marcação com mais um
nenhum comentário
nenhum compartilhamento
Compartilhada somente com você•Ver atividadeAdicione um comentário…

5 marcações com mais um

5

nenhum comentário

um compartilhamento

1
Anúncios

Um comentário sobre “https://www.linkedin.com/in/lucascamara

Deixe um comentário

Preencha os seus dados abaixo ou clique em um ícone para log in:

Logotipo do WordPress.com

Você está comentando utilizando sua conta WordPress.com. Sair / Alterar )

Imagem do Twitter

Você está comentando utilizando sua conta Twitter. Sair / Alterar )

Foto do Facebook

Você está comentando utilizando sua conta Facebook. Sair / Alterar )

Foto do Google+

Você está comentando utilizando sua conta Google+. Sair / Alterar )

Conectando a %s